Greeneville High School Awarded Bronze Medal
Posted On:
Tuesday, May 09, 2017
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Greeneville High School Awarded Bronze Medal

2017 U.S. News & World Report Best High Schools

 

GREENEVILLE, TN – April 27, 2017 – Greeneville High School has been awarded a bronze medal from the 2017 U.S. News & World Report Best High Schools. GHS was ranked 36th in the state of Tennessee. Schools are ranked based on their performance on state-required tests and how well they prepare students for college.

“I am excited for the teachers and students of Greeneville City Schools,” said Greeneville City Schools’ Director Dr. Jeff Moorhouse. “To have our high school recognized by a national publication is a jewel for our community. I am happy for Principal Fraley, his administration, and the faculty of GHS to be rewarded for their hard work and dedication to students. I want to especially thank the students and parents of GHS for their stepping up to the challenge of taking rigorous course work. An important component of this metric is that of AP and the number of students who are accepting the challenge.”

Nationally, the U.S. News report uses the following criteria:

STEP 1: Students perform better than expected in their state.
Reading and math results for students on each state's proficiency tests and then factored in the percentage of economically disadvantaged students, who tend to score lower.

STEP 2: Disadvantaged students perform better than the state average.
A comparison of each school's math and reading proficiency rates for disadvantaged students - black, Hispanic and low-income - with the statewide results for these student groups and then selected schools that were performing better than their state averages.

STEP 3: Student graduation rates meet or exceed a national standard
Schools were excluded from consideration if their graduation rates were lower than 75 percent - a threshold that is higher than a federal law that requires states to give extra resources to schools below 67 percent.

STEP 4: Students are prepared for college-level coursework.
A College Readiness Index calculation, which is based on the school's AP participation rate and how well the students did on those tests. Tiebreakers were used to determine ranks of schools that achieved the same College Readiness Index.